Tel: 01727 537477

Tel: 01202 798128

Email: dee@simplyamazingtraining.co.uk

  • 01727 537477 | 01202 798128 | dee@simplyamazingtraining.co.uk

How to introduce yourself in a presentation?


Advanced presentation skills training course

One thing that people seem to find difficult when it comes to presenting and public speaking is how to introduce themselves. I’m often asked: Should I do a long introduction? How much detail should I go into about my qualifications and experience? Should I talk the audience through some facts and stats about my company? I have a one-word answer to how to introduce yourself, and that word is briefly.

Start your presentation with a little introduction

In my Simply Amazing Structure™ outlined in my book and presentation skills training sessions, I encourage clients to start with a little introduction – and the clue is in the word little! Please don’t tell the audience that the company was established in 1978 and has 67 offices around the globe. At this point, they don’t care and your primary aim is to build a rapport with them. Once you have built this rapport, it might be possible to mention some of these details later – but only if they are relevant.

So, start with your name and the context in which you are speaking to them. For example: “My name is Frank Milligan and today we are going to discuss the new staff intranet.” A quick and simple introduction allows the audience to get into the right head space. This is particularly important if you are one in a long line of presenters in a day, such as at a board meeting or a quarterly review meeting presentation.

I advise no more than a three sentence introduction in most cases, but it can even be done in one sentence. After your brief introduction, you should go straight into why they want to listen to you.

Find out more about how to plan a business presentation.

For presentations it’s all about your audience, not you

As I mentioned before, sometimes it can be tempting to give too much detail in a presentation. It’s important to ask yourself why you want to include certain facts. Is it to build credibility? To demonstrate your knowledge? If so, make sure you think about the audience and what they want to hear rather than what you want to tell them.

When you do give the audience facts, try and think about storytelling. For example, instead of saying: “I founded the company in 1978” you could say “It’s hard to believe that when I founded the company in 1978, we started with one employee, £200 in the bank and no heating.” This way the fact (the founding year) almost becomes an aside in a much friendlier, more relatable story.  

So remember SAS when it comes to introductions – my Simply Amazing Structure™, and also short and sweet!

Simply Amazing Training offers professional  presentation skills courses and public speaking coaching  for directors, managers, marketing and sales teams of corporate companies near London, Bournemouth and St Albans. Call me today on 01202 798128 for an informal chat to discuss your bespoke presentation skills training requirements.

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