Mind Map for presentation

Interview Presentations

The presentation is your chance to shine. You are away from the constraints of just answering questions.

“What’s your X-Factor?”

Treat it as your opportunity to show others what makes you unique.

Always read the brief carefully before beginning – like reading an exam paper properly. Make sure you know how long you have to present and if it includes time for questions. Check any terminology and consider what equipment or props you may need. Consider what their purpose is for setting this task and what they are looking for.

Do your research. Research the organisation or department and the key positions. Research the people on the panel if possible and of course the position. Know the job description thoroughly and understand any key competencies they are looking for. Match your personal strengths to the key competencies required in the role.

Tame your “Public Speaking Monkeys”. Ensure nerves don’t get the best of you and you can represent your best self.

Read “Taming Your Public Speaking MonkeysD.Clayton on Amazon.

See things from their point of view. Consider what problems the organisation or role may face.
Demonstrate you understand and have the solutions they need, or at least the right attitude to address the challenges and start to solve problems.

What benefits do you bring to the organisation or role? What can you help them to achieve or gain that others can’t? Do you have evidence of achieving targets? Will you help the department to improve or better justify the budget?

Preparation is worth its weight in gold. Mind Mapping is a great tool for dumping all your ideas into one place visually. Look at all the information and ideas and narrow them down to three main points. Avoid the temptation of verbal diarrhoea!

Structure your presentation – how will you position your main points? Use examples whenever possible. Telling stories with a beginning middle and end is a great way to convey information that humans naturally tune into.

For each section or point, use our Simply Amazing Structure™ (SAS) summarised below.

Using SAS structure in presentations

  • WHY? A short introduction giving the audience reasons why they want to listen to what you have to say.
  • WHAT? The content: This covers the facts and information, the evidence behind the why.
  • HOW? The Usability & relevance: this section covers the answer to “how will they benefit from the information or proposal?” Perhaps you will suggest that they could investigate similar solutions.
  • WHAT IF? Future benefit: This briefly describes the difference in the future, if the audience buys into your way of seeing things. This also serves as a motivational summary.

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Dee Clayton

Posted by Dee Clayton on 6 Apr 2018

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